Foods That Heal And Lower Inflammation

Updated: Apr 20


April 20, 2022


Last Wednesday, we continued to explore the gut microbiome and introduced "gut permeability". We are discovering the delicate yet incredibly diverse eco system that is our stomach, intestines' and the colon. The membrane barrier surrounding these areas is also very important! The purpose of the these membranes are to either contain what bacteria and enzymes are needed to remain inside the gut for best digestion, or release enzymes that should go into the bloodstream. When we introduce unhealthy foods, drugs and toxins that are not healthy for of our genetic nature, into our bodies, we can breakdown the healthy microbiome balance and can harm to the gut membrane. These toxins or unnatural properties can get then also get into our bloodstream and create chronic inflammation and disease over time.


One question that did come up in recently was in regard to probiotics and how to know what to look for in the ingredient list when choosing a healthy yogurt. Here is a synopsis of what I found on my online search.


Medical News Today - Online Website 2020

Some yogurts have probiotics added to them.

Probiotics are a type of healthy bacteria that benefit the gut. They help regulate the digestive system and decrease gas, diarrhea, constipation, and bloating.

Some research has suggested that probiotics can boost the immune system, help with weight management, and reduce the risk of cancer.

Consuming yogurt and other probiotic foods may enhance absorption of vitamins and minerals. The two most common bacteria used to ferment milk into yogurt are Lactobacillus bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) and Streptococcus thermophiles (S. thermophiles), but many yogurts contain additional bacterial strains.

To help consumers identify yogurts with live and active cultures, the National Yogurt Association has implemented the Life & Active Cultures (LAC) seal, found on the product container.

In most cases, the fresher the product, the more live bacteria it will contain.

A recent study from the University of Toronto points out that different probiotics will have different effects, and some yogurts containing probiotics may be healthier than others.


Everyday Health.com


Yogurt is a cultured or fermented milk product that is soured and thickened by adding specific lactic acid-producing cultures to milk. The basic cultures or probiotics used to make yogurt are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Additional probiotics are often added. Common ones are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidus, all of which may help to maintain the balance of bacteria needed to boost the immune system and promote a healthy digestive tract.


Probiotics are living microorganisms that help stop bad or undesirable bacteria from overgrowing in the gut. They may help fight diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and colon diseases.


If you’re buying yogurt for its health benefits, no matter what its base ingredient, the key to making the right choice is being sure it contains live and active cultures. The label on the container will tell you what probiotics are in the yogurt. Some yogurts carry the National Yogurt Association’s (NYA) “Live and Active Culture” seal, but if that label is not on the container, look at the ingredient panel.


“Yogurt is a healthy addition to the diet because it contains calcium, protein, and active cultures,” said Lori Rosenthal, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian in the department of surgery at the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. "But it’s not a major cure-all f disorders because it just doesn’t have enough cultures to fight serious problems.




Below, I have found three websites that give a great deal of information regarding "healthy, anti-Inflammatory" foods.


There is also a optional TED Talk about the Canada's Food Policy or lack there of. It is 15 minutes long but is also good food for thought!


I hope you are able to enjoy your Easter Weekend with family and friends in person or online.

Be Well

💕🙏Beth



Food for Thought


What’s the Difference Between Probiotics and Prebiotics? | SCL Health


8 Anti-Inflammatory Foods I Eat Every Week - Downshiftology


12 Fiber-Rich Foods to Help with Good Gut Bacteria | EatingWell


Best Probiotic Yogurts in Canada


Coming up with a Canadian food policy | Diana Bronson | TEDxConcordia - YouTube










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